What’s In a Name

Day 65

I was walking through the cafeteria today during first grade lunch. Other than one of the special needs kids screaming and someone inexplicably mooing, what I heard most was “Hi, Library!”  If I can attempt to learn the names of 700 students, you would think that a few of them could attempt to learn mine.  Or at least call me “Library Teacher” instead of after a room in the school.

That is, when they aren’t calling me “Li-bear-y.”

The Computer Teacher from the Black Lagoon

Day 64

“I made the kindergarteners cry,” said the computer teacher to me.  Apparently she was asked to teach them to log into our computer system.  However . . . to do so, one needs both a login and a password.  The login is the student’s first initial plus the student’s last name.

Keep in mind that these are five-year-olds.  A good number of them come to school not knowing their last names.  I have one girl who insists her last name is Grace (middle name).

Then, the student’s password is their seven-digit student ID number assigned by the state.  As the computer teacher told me, the first row of kids started crying, “I don’t know how to read! Boo-hoo-hoo,” and it just rolled right down the rows of computers.  I can only imagine the horror she felt, at the same time  as I chuckle, glad it wasn’t me!

This brings me to a relatively rare editorial statement as I end this post:  you can’t legislate children into doing things they are not developmentally ready to do.  I recently read this article:  Five-Year-Olds Put To the Test as Kindergarten Exams Gain Steam, in which our youngest students are given standardized tests “meant to determine whether 5-year-olds are on track to succeed in college and career.”  There’s a unit “to introduce 5-year-olds to algebraic thinking” — seriously, people?  How about we introduce them to letters, numbers, and forming a line first?

Elvis Lives!

Day 63

I’ve been reading the book The Shelf Elf to kindergarten.  It’s about the two ELVES from the story about the ELVES and the shoemaker and how one of the ELVES goes on to live in a library.  The idea is that the librarian gets a little ELF and hides it around the library where it can catch students showing proper library manners.

I dropped by a kindergarten classroom this morning and students came rushing up to me asking “Is he here today?”  Their teacher said they were all excited and what was this they were telling her about Elvis?

Apparently my elf will have to wear a white jumpsuit.

Family Gathering

Day 60

My aunt and her husband have been visiting this week from Texas for his 40th college reunion.  So we gathered this afternoon after church for a family reunion at Mom’s.  I know my mom was missing the old days when there were kids underfoot everywhere — this time it was just my dad, his brothers, sister, spouses, and my cousin and I.  With my cousin around fifty years old, I was the youngest there — and not by all that many years!  It was good to see everyone though, even if the men wound up watching the football game and the women sat in the kitchen chatting (some things never change).

 

 

 

The Fall Festival

Day 59

Today was a version of founders’ day in our little hamlet.  The parade goes right past my house, so of course lots of school kids in the parade start calling to me and tossing candy at me.  One year a little girl threw a piece of candy halfway to my backyard — sign her up for fast pitch softball!  After the parade I strolled about a quarter mile down to the meetinghouse lawn where there was a small craft fair and car show.  A crisp fall day in the small town heartland of America.  It was like walking around inside a stereotype.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day 58: September Roses

For someone who never gets flowers, I  sure was surprised this week.  A coworker brought me a rose for helping her find some books, and a friend from church who owns a floral shop brought me one Wednesday.

I guess I can’t say I never get flowers anymore!  They’re beautiful.